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20120920
20120920
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solemnly affirm that i will support and defend the constitution of the united states and the constitution of the state of california, against all enemies, foreign and domestic, that i will bear true faith and allegiance to the constitution of the united states and the constitution of the state of california, that i take this obligation freely, without any mental reservation or purpose of evasion, and then i will well and faithfully discharge the duties upon which i am about to enter during such time as i hold the office of a member of the city college board of trustees for the city and county of san francisco. congratulations. [applause] ladies and gentlemen, if i could present to you, rodrigo santos, the newest member of our board of trustees. [applause] >> i am honored for this great appointment. as a new member of the board of trustees, i can tell you i will do everything in my power to ensure not only do we follow the great work of former trustee milton marks. that great legacy of public service. but at the same time, i join an institution that must be saved, an institution that must
effort in the state of california and in the country of the united states to try to roll back the horrendous rates of incarceration that have happened in this country over the last 30 years. i mean, that's the context, right? the united states, i think most of you know these numbers now, but we're less than 5% of the world's population but almost 25% of the world's incarcerated population. we rank first in the world in the per capita incarceration of our fellow citizens. the russians are fading fast in second or third place together with the belarus people. the rates of the incarceration are five, six, seven, eight times than most in other societies, europe and elsewhere, though their rates of nonviolent crime and drug use are not that much different than ours. so if another country were to lock up its own people at the rate that we do, and if our rates of incarceration were more normative to the rest of the world, we would regard with that other country was doing as a massive violation of human rights. that's the way we would look at it. now, the other point here is what we'r
of preventable deaths in the united states, and the two major factors that have reduced smoking in san francisco from about 20% to about 11.9% from 190 to now are snoak-free laws and tobacco taxes and that would be -- the -- if we were to allow smoking in this facility. >> so the department of public health is asking the board to please uphold the 30 day suspension because the business knowingly and repeatedly violated the ordinance since the first meeting in june 2010. the department also is asking the board to help send a message to the public and business owners that smoking is not -- will not be allowed in prohibited areas. and the only way we can do that is by upholding the cease and desist order which includes removal of the smoking devices from the cafe. thank you. >> vice president fung: ms. young, two questions. one is the no employees -- i saw that in the bar or tavern designation. does that also apply to tobacco shop? >> first of all, i just wanted to let you know that when i did my inspections in may and june -- february and may, and when i went there last night as well, they have em
of recovery. his city is a model for the rest of the united states to emulate. the honorable edwin lee. [applause] ç>> thank you. next time i see mayor willie brown, i will remind him it was fema. [laughter] we will have to name a doorway in addition to the staircase. thank you, everyone, for coming to san francisco. it is a pleasure to receive new and open up our house and to have you discuss, plan, and create relationships perhaps you do not have today among the federal and local police -- agencies working together on recovery. our city has been working hard. we have seen the future. the future is that if we're not prepared, it will not be our future. i got a glimpse of that some years ago when staff and i went down to new orleans. we have begun to realize the devastation was the result of things that could have been done there are national lessons to be learned from any major disaster across our country, what we could have done better. when i visited there those years ago, we stood at the night éovardç -- at the ninthç ward. in addition to taking pictures, we just stood there
record 98 disasters declared in the united states. about 0.5% or five of those, we deployed in federal disaster recovery coordinator to work with the communities and works through the issues. we still have folks out there from hud and other agencies providing recover its support functions. whether it is presidentially declared or not, who do you need out there immediately to have your communityñr and the citizes taking care of as it looks to rebuild? this can go on on a daily basis in the things you do. çwhenever there is a house fir, we see the red cross helping to make sure people have immediate needs taken care of. last year with hurricane irene along the eastç coast, we have3 states impacted by that. there was all the work that had to happen with the crossing over and integrating of support functions providing resources needed for the communities we did needed by the committees for recovery. i have gone on for quite a while. i wanted to set the stage for you and encourage you to dialogue. bring your comments. i hope i have stirred up some pots, things you want to know more abo
the united states is made up. that is how you work. north and south vietnam, for instance. they divide people so that the pressure will not be on them. that is how i see the system. i see it in prison, how they divide inmates. it is scary if inmates unite, and they do not like that. when i first come to prison, it will be a big thing if i went and sat with the blacks. it would be a big think if they caucasian sat with the asians. we only did that one time, where everybody got together, and we got what we wanted. when you unite, you can conquer. [applause] >> next question is for the commander. how can they community-based organization contact the task force for speaking engagements? >> if you call and ask to speak to jim miller. >> is there any effort to formalize the relationship with a community-based organization? >> right now, we do not have that effort in place. it is a good idea, it is something that we have talked about. it is important for us to understand what the cbos are doing. it is important for them to have specific training for their individuals. they should also have some guid
of the united states will play a strong part in the development of these vehicles. as well as we also started a venture firm. the venture fund operates out of new york. it started 15 months ago, we made our first investment in a company called my city way, which is working on intermodal transport. started in new york, now in 35 cities around the country and many cities around the world provided information to not only our customers, but also anyone interested in moving from a to be in a city. that has worked exceedingly well. as you have seen, we have been investing in other companies as well. the electric charging stations system is another one of those. as is our first in this and in parking. most of us leave our house is in the morning, go to work, part of our cars at work, leave a vacant parking space at home. if you can bring a marketplace together where someone can park under drive during the day, and of course, give them a certainty of where they will part, it works. many thousands of customers now are enjoying that has a potential different way of operating in the city. drive now was
pledge allegiance to the flag of the united states of america. into the republic, for which it stands, one nation under god, indivisible, with liberty and justice for all. thank you. you can have a seat. i would like to acknowledge and introduce some of the people we have on the stage with us. first, at the police commission president, thomas mazzucco, commissioner kingsley, paul henderson from the mayor's office as representing because the mayor was unable to come tonight. also, we have commissioner loftus. also, the command at steep. d staff. deputy chief james that lake, lyn tomioka, leanora militello, and next to lyn commander biel, corrier from field comman. i would like to introduce chief grigory p. suhr. >> good evening, and hopefully lyn still wants to be your boss tomorrow. i know it is quiet and there are a lot of kids in the room. that is terrific. the medal of valor ceremony is the best event that we get to attend. it is when there is a crisis, emergency, extreme danger and takes everything you have to go forward, and everyone else that would want to run away, the people y
more supervision than we typically get in the united states. it's usually much more cost-effective to manage them outside of a facility with high scrutiny than it is to incarcerate. as you probably know, california spends about eight times as much money for every inmate as it does for every student in the university of california system. and so you could reorganize those resources and put they will more towards supervision and other types of things and manage a lot of those individuals that are currently incarcerated in a much more effective way that is going to save you tax dollars but also reduce the chance that they'll continue to spiral into those, like the stories we heard earlier today. [applause] >> if i could add one quick thought that ties with the first panel and this panel. it's the question of resource allocation. the point needs to be taken quite seriously especially with adolescents. if you get the diagnosis and the community is not ready to step up and do the interventions that are more humane, then the inhumane alternatives may end up costing more but bein
and my understanding is most of these buildings contain housing in the upper units almost exclusively, it's pretty much all retail, i think the rest have housing and you already said that they're consistent with the general plan for the reasons stated and then the final one was the sustainable communities and what's more sustainable than keeping what we've already got and not having to tear it down and build something new, so it seems that this is extremely well thought of and these are beautiful buildings and i agree also with ms. esther the ground floors need a little work because often we assess the character of a building and we don't -- or maybe are distracted by its beauty by what may be going on in the first floor, perhaps not the use but works well with the building itself or is appealing in and of *it for people to be drawn to the thing but that's an ongoing process and as things hopefully begin to become more economically viable along market particularly, this part of market, these buildings will be the centerpiece and i hope they're the template of what's built to fill in the v
the beginning of the women's equality movement in the united states. >> at that time, women were banned from holding property and voting in elections. >> susan b. anthony dedicated her life to reform. >> suffrage in the middle of the 19th century accomplished one goal, it was diametrically opposed to this idea. >> many feared it would be corrupted by politics. >> women in the 19th century had to convince male voters that having the vote would not change anything. that woman would still be devoted to the home, the family, that they would remain pure and innocent, that having the vote would not corrupt them. >> support gradually grew in state and local campaigns. >> leaders like ellen clark sgt come repeatedly stopping these meetings -- , repeatedly stopping these meetings as a politically active figure. doing everything they could to ground the campaign in domesticity. >> despite their efforts, the link made it tough whenever voters were in the big city. a specialist in francisco. >> the problem with san francisco is that women's suffrage as an idea was associated. >> susan b. anthony joined
Search Results 0 to 10 of about 11

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